Connect with us

Business

Russia Seeks Control of Southern Ukraine, Says Top Russian Commander

Avatar

Published

on

A senior Russian military commander said Russia aimed to seize the whole of Ukraine’s Donbas region and capture territory linking it to the annexed Crimean peninsula.

Russian troops began a “second phase” of the war “two days ago” and “one of the Russian army’s tasks is establishing total control of the Donbas and southern Ukraine”, Rustam Minnekayev, acting commander of Russia’s central military district, was quoted as saying on Friday by Interfax.

Minnekayev added that controlling southern Ukraine would open “another way to Transnistria”, a separatist enclave in Moldova where a small Russian contingent is based and where he claimed “there are also instances of oppressing the Russian-speaking population”.

The comments appeared to indicate that Russian president Vladimir Putin has more ambitious targets for the latest offensive than previously outlined.

Russia has claimed all along that its main goal was to “liberate” the Donbas region, an eastern Ukrainian border territory mostly controlled by Moscow-backed separatists. Russian troops started a major offensive to capture the region this week after attempts to seize Kyiv and other central Ukrainian cities failed.

Capturing southern Ukraine would “allow us to set up a land corridor to Crimea and affect vital parts of the Ukrainian economy”, Minnekayev said.

Moldovan officials told the Financial Times earlier this month that they were becoming increasingly concerned by statements by both Ukrainian and Russian authorities about the potential for a provocation staged in Transnistria that could drag the separatist region into the war.

There had been no signs that the Russian soldiers and pro-Kremlin proxy troops there were mobilising, the Moldovan officials added.

Russia captured territory north of the Crimean peninsula, which it annexed in 2014, in the early days of the war, but has failed to make further gains or link it with the broader front.

Capturing the port city of Mariupol, which Putin claimed to have “liberated” on Thursday even as fighting persisted there, would be a significant step in connecting the Donbas region to Russia’s forces in the south, analysts say.

The two-month siege has almost completely destroyed Mariupol, which is a major hub for Ukraine’s exports and the last significant city not already under Russian control in the region.

About 2,000 Ukrainian fighters are thought to be holding out at Mariupol’s Azovstal’s steelworks, which Russia has bombed heavily throughout this week after Ukraine’s remaining forces rejected their demands to surrender.

On Friday morning, a senior Ukrainian official said Russia was refusing to allow civilians to evacuate safely from the steelworks.

About 1,000 civilians, including children, are at the plant, according to Ukraine’s deputy prime minister Iryna Vereshchuk.

“There is a corridor for the military to surrender,” Vereshchuk said in a post on Telegram. “The Russians have provided one, but we don’t need it, as our military don’t want to surrender.”

“There is also a humanitarian corridor to evacuate the civilians out of the combat zone. We need such a corridor from Azovstal to evacuate women, children and the elderly.”

Read More

Original Post: ft.com

Business

Iceland Announces Packing Ban Set Roll Out in Every UK Supermarket ‘What a Pain!’

Avatar

Published

on

ICELAND has contacted its customers to announce a change to its home delivery shopping service.

Continue Reading

Business

EY: a Management Consultant’s PowerPoint Guide to Splitting Up

Avatar

Published

on

By

EY is hatching a pioneering split of its audit and advisory operations. It is a U-turn but a welcome one that — if it materialises — may set a template for its fellow Big Four audit firms. Presumably EY will start, as must all management consultants worth their salt, with a PowerPoint presentation. Lex previews the slide deck.

Slide 1: Venn diagram. EY’s global workforce of 312,000 does not coalesce into two buckets of audit and consultancy. In the middle sit a whole slew of bodies whose function serves both arms: in tax, pensions, IT, cyber security, industry expertise and other skill sets. Putting a line down the middle and sending half into the audit arm and the remainder into consultancy will not fly. Creating a third arm, which both sets can tap, seems messy.

Slide 2: Metaverse-mapped 3D flow chart (VR goggles provided). Take 140 countries, with — conservatively — twice that number of interested regulators and as many different legal structures. Add 13,000 partners, all of whom will have their own vested interests in terms of ring fencing liabilities and tapping income flows. They hold far more muscle than would be the case in your average public company: directors are replaceable, partners are the business.

Slide 3: Scatter plot chart. Severing ties with audit eliminates conflicts and thus widens the field of tech players EY can team up with to service clients. But that leaves it competing with the big integrated tech-savvy companies such as France’s Capgemini and Intel, Cognizant and Accenture (which has a two-decade head-start in going it alone) in the US.

Slide 4: Winners and losers. Slipped in at the end, because there will be many. In some ways Big Four firms resemble McDonald’s, or any other franchise. The local rainmakers draw in the business and a portion of fees go out for the name over the shopfront and technology. Asymmetric fiefdoms inevitably mean some partners have more to lose than others.

Tombstone: RIP the partnership model. It will take some fiendishly clever footwork to avoid tearing up the structure that has underpinned the industry through history. Client work is a doddle compared with this one.

Read More

Original Source: ft.com

Continue Reading

Business

EY Explores IPO or Partial Sale of Global Advisory Business

Avatar

Published

on

By

EY is exploring a public listing or partial sale of its global advisory business as part of the most radical transformation of a Big Four accountancy firm in two decades, according to people with direct knowledge of the matter.

A stake sale or listing would raise the prospect of a massive windfall for EY’s existing partners who own and run the firm, reminiscent of the IPOs of Goldman Sachs in 1999 and Accenture in 2001.

The 312,000-strong firm, which along with Deloitte, KPMG and PwC dominates the accounting industry, is considering a historic break-up of its business as a solution to the conflicts of interest that have dogged the profession and attracted regulatory scrutiny.

EY’s advisory businesses, which offer tax, consulting and deals advice, generated revenues of $26bn last year and employ 166,000 advisers.

EY’s audit business, which generated revenues of $14bn last year, is likely to remain as a partnership following any break-up. Some advisers would shift to the audit side to support its work in areas such as tax, said people with knowledge of the details.

The newly independent advisory business would have the option of incorporating as a company, allowing it to take on external funding through a sale or IPO. Fresh investment could help it to boost growth and compete with larger consulting businesses such as Accenture, which reported revenues of $51bn last year and is valued at about $200bn on the New York Stock Exchange.

A break-up would also free EY’s advisory business to win work from companies audited by EY, opening up a swath of potential new clients that are currently off-limits under independence rules.

EY was being advised on its planning by JPMorgan and Goldman Sachs, people with knowledge of the matter said. The banks declined to comment.

The firm’s senior partners have yet to make a firm proposal to partners on whether to proceed with a restructuring and exactly what form it should take.

The sale of part of the business to external shareholders would be a radical departure. A senior partner at another firm said that selling parts of the business and handing the windfall to partners would significantly alter the existing structure where “you come in naked and you leave naked” with the business’s capital preserved for the next generation.

The Big Four are structured as networks of legally separate national member firms that pay a fee each year for shared branding, systems and technology. The set-up has prevented them from taking on external investment and made it difficult to push through radical overhauls, which require a broad consensus across the business.

However, EY is seen by many accountants as being best placed among the Big Four to push through significant international changes because its global bosses have greater influence than at competitors, where rank-and-file partners have more power.

Partners at EY will nonetheless have the opportunity to vote on any changes. Asked whether EY might line up investors before a ballot, a person with knowledge of the matter said: “We’re looking through those options. We’ll be looking to see what’s in the right interests of all the partners.”

EY and other professional services firms have “the doorbell ringing all the time” from private equity firms seeking to invest in parts of their business, said this person. An IPO would be more difficult to pull off than a private stake sale, the person added.

A split by EY would force its rivals to decide whether to follow suit. On Friday, PwC and KPMG both said they believed in the benefits of having their audit and consulting businesses under one roof.

PwC said it had “no plans to change course”. KPMG said a multidisciplinary model “brings a range of benefits”. Deloitte did not comment.

A break-up would probably attract dissent from some partners. Auditing has historically had lower profit margins and could struggle to recruit and retain staff, especially expert partners who make most of their money from consulting but provide crucial expertise in areas such as tax, said Big Four partners.

EY declined to comment on the possibility of a stake sale or an IPO. After news of its break-up planning on Thursday, global chief executive Carmine Di Sibio told staff in an email on Friday that “no . . . decisions have been made”.

Read More

Original Post: ft.com

Continue Reading

Trending

FTFO.com